Prospective Students

The Division of Medical Sciences (DMS) at Harvard Medical School with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University offers six interdisciplinary programs leading to the PhD degree in the biomedical sciences.

 

 

These six programs share a common purpose: to foster a stimulating and supportive environment for research training in the biomedical sciences.

 

The Division of Medical Sciences was established at Harvard University in 1908 to provide students wishing to pursue careers in research and teaching with a broad education in basic biomedical science fields and specialization in one of them. Classroom and laboratory instruction are conducted primarily by approximately 650 faculty members of the basic sciences departments and affiliated hospital laboratories of the Harvard Medical School (HMS) in Boston. The Ph.D. degree is awarded by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) of Harvard University. For over 100 years, this fruitful collaboration has spawned research achievements across the spectrum from basic science to experimental medicine. Since 1909, over 2,800 Division graduates, including six Nobel Laureates, have gone on to distinguished careers in biomedical research, university teaching, and a number of increasingly diverse careers.

 

The Student Body 

Each year, about 115 students begin graduate study. Current enrollment is 710, with affiliated faculty numbering slightly lower at 648. Our students come from a variety of undergraduate institutions throughout the United States and from many foreign countries. Women account for about one-half of the enrollment.

Bioinformatics & Integrative Genomics

36 Students

53 Faculty Members

 

Biological & Biomedical Sciences

382 Students

336 Faculty Members

 

Immunology

68 Students

138 Faculty Members

 

Neuroscience

120 Students

141 Faculty Members

 

Speech & Hearing Bioscience & Technology

36 Students

62 Faculty Members

 

Virology

68 Students

50 Faclty Members


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