Grant List: Active Grants

Common and distinct early environmental influences on cardiometabolic and respiratory health: Mechanisms and methods (ECHO)

Grant received by: Oken (HPHC) / Kleinman (UMass Amherst)
Grant number: UH3 OD023286 (formerly UG3 OD023286; please use UH3 now)
Dates active: 9/21/16-8/31/23
Funding Institution: Office of the Director, NIH
When to cite: Every publication using Viva data (except neuro-development)

Objective:
The overall goal is to address the question: “What environmental exposures from conception to age 5, singly and as mixtures, influence the separate and co-evolution of obesity, asthma, and related dysfunctions?” 

Specific Aims:
To address the following questions:
1. To what environmental factors are mothers and children actually exposed longitudinally from conception onwards?

2. What trajectories result in the separate or co-evolution of obesity and asthma phenotypes as well as their persistence or resolution?

3. How do environmental exposures act to influence cardiometabolic and respiratory health outcomes, when during early life do they matter most, and in whom and under what circumstances do they act most strongly? In particular we will consider

a. Mediation by biological (e.g., hormones, DNA methylation) and behavioral (e.g., dietary) pathways

b. Critical or sensitive periods for emergence, resilience, or resolution of phenotypes

c. Modification by a priori hypothesized factors from genes to society.

4. What type and timing of potential interventions in pregnancy and early childhood are most likely to prevent obesity and asthma, or promote their resolution?

Funded Assays:
1. IGF - 1 – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
2. IGFBP – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
3. sTNFr-II – child : 800 to be collected at Mid- Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
4. IL-6 – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
5. hsCRP – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
6. Adiponectin – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
7. Leptin – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
8. Hemoglobin A1c – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
9. ALT – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
10. Immunoglobulins – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
11. CBC – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
12. Baby teeth – child: 1150 to be collected. Currently funded, not yet completed
13. Cortisol - hair samples – child: 1100 collected at Mid-Childhood. Currently funded, not yet completed
14. Cortisol - hair samples – child: 1100 collected at Early Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
15. Cortisol - hair samples – child: 1000 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
16. Fructosamine – mom: 1400 collected at Second Trimester. Currently funded, not yet completed
17. DNA – Mom: All remaining unanalyzed samples. Currently funded, not yet completed
18. DNA – Child: All remaining unanalyzed samples. Currently funded, not yet completed
19. GWAS – Mom: All remaining unanalyzed samples. Currently funded, not yet completed
20. GWAS – Child: All remaining unanalyzed samples. Currently funded, not yet completed

Pre- and Peri-natal Predictors of Childhood Obesity -Viva (continuation)

Grant received by: Oken (HPHC)
Grant number: R01 HD034568 (formerly R37 HD034568; please use R01 now)
Dates active: 2/1/17-1/31/22
Funding Institution: NICHD
When to cite: Every publication using Viva data

Objective:
In this continuation, our overall goals are to characterize how children’s trajectories of growth and adiposity that appear set from early life may improve – or worsen – as they traverse adolescence; to understand underlying metabolic changes, and to identify and quantify modifiable determinants of these changes, especially those that can reverse earlier trajectories of dysmetabolism.

Specific Aims:
1. Characterize trajectories of body mass index, skinfold thickness, DXA fat and fat-free mass, and components of the metabolic syndrome through mid/late adolescence.

2. Use metabolomics profiling in plasma from mid-childhood and mid/late adolescence to refine characterization of trajectories defines only by size, adiposity, or risk factors.

3. Examine modifiable determinants of these trajectory changes at several levels from physiology through behavioral and social factors.

4. Use single nucleotide polymorphisms as instrumental variables to determine the causal sequences between metabolites and adiposity phenotypes, which may be bi-directional.

5. With the metabolomics and causal sequences in hand, examine the most promising determinants from Aim 2 as predictors of metabolic trajectory changes in adolescence.

Funded Assays:
1. Metabolomics – child: 584 collected at Mid-Childhood. Analysis in progress
2. Metabolomics – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
3. Fasting Glucose – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
4. Insulin – child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
5. Total Cholesterol - child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
6. HDL Cholesterol - child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed
7. Triglycerides - child: 800 to be collected at Mid-Teen. Currently funded, not yet completed

Long-Term Health Consequences of Birth by Cesarean Section

Grant received by: Chavarro (HSPH)/Oken (HPHC)
Grant number: R01HD093761-01
Dates active: 9/1/18—6/30/23
Funding Institution: NICHD
When to cite: Check with Jorge Chavarro before citing

Objective:
To evaluate the impact of cesarean delivery on clinical markers of chronic disease risk throughout childhood and to further evaluate the biologic underpinnings of these relations.

Specific Aims:
1.To compare the onset of puberty and longitudinal trajectories in biomarkers of cancer and cardio-metabolic risk, from childhood through adolescence, between children born by cesarean and by vaginal delivery.

Hypothesis: Children born by cesarean delivery will reach puberty earlier and have a more adverse risk profile of mitogenesis (IGF-I, IGFBP3) and inflammatory markers (hsCRP, IL-6, sTNFR2), adipokines (leptin, adiponectin), blood lipids (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides) and insulin/glucose metabolism markers (glucose, insulin), than those born by vaginal delivery.

2.To compare longitudinal trajectories in body composition measured using DEXA, from childhood through adolescence, between children born by cesarean and by vaginal delivery.

Hypothesis: Children born by cesarean delivery will have higher total fat mass and higher abdominal fat mass than those born by vaginal delivery.

3. To compare longitudinal trajectories in whole genome DNA methylation patterns in peripheral blood between children born by cesarean section and by vaginal delivery.

Hypothesis: Differences in DNA methylation related to cesarean delivery will be detectable in cord blood; some of these differences will persist later in childhood.

4. To compare longitudinal trajectories in gut microbiome between children born by cesarean and by vaginal delivery.

Hypothesis: Differences in gut microbiota related to cesarean delivery previously identified in infants will persist later in childhood.

 

As a secondary aim, we will examine whether genome-wide DNA methylation patterns (Project Viva) or gut microbiome patterns (VDAART) associated with cesarean delivery are related to body composition (sex-specific BMI-for-age z-scores in both cohorts; DEXA-assessed fat mass in Project Viva) during childhood.

Environmental Chemicals, Adiposity, and Bone Accrual Across Adolescence

Grant received by: Fleish (Maine Medical Center)/Oken (HPHC)
Grant number: R01 ES030101
Dates active: 2/1/19 - 1/31/24
Funding Institution: NIH
When to cite: Check with Abby Fleisch before citing

Objective:
To identify dietary predictors of PFAS and phthalate exposures and to characterize the impact of chemical exposures independent of diet on development of adiposity and low bone mineral density in peripubertal children.

Specific Aims:
1. Identify dietary factors that predict concentrations of PFAS and phthalate biomarkers in childhood
Hypothesis 1: Children with a more Western-style diet and frequent consumption of foods such as red meat and fast foods will have higher concentrations of PFAS and phthalate biomarkers in mid-childhood.

2. Examine associations of PFASs and phthalates in childhood with adiposity in adolescence
Hypothesis 2: Children with higher concentrations of PFAS and phthalate biomarkers in mid-childhood will have greater central adiposity in late adolescence, even after accounting for diet..

3. Study associations of PFASs and phthalates in childhood with bone mineral density in adolescence
Hypothesis 3A: Children with higher concentrations of PFAS and phthalate biomarkers in mid-childhood will have lower bone mineral density z-scores in late adolescence, even after accounting for diet.
Hypothesis 3B: Associations of PFASs and phthalates with lower bone mineral density will be partially mediated by greater central adiposity

Funded Assays:
1. Urine phthalate metabolites– child: 876 collected at Mid-Childhood. Currently funded, not yet completed
2. Urine specific gravity - child; 876 collected at Mid-Childhood. Currently funded, not yet completed

Exposure to Air Pollutants and Upper Airway Microbial Communities in Project Viva, A Pre-Birth Cohort Study

Grant received by: Sordillo (HPHC)
Grant number: 5P30ES000002-57
Dates active: 4/1/19 - 12/31/21
Funding Institution: HPHC
When to cite: Check with Joanne Sordillo before citing
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon

A lifecourse Approach to Women’s Cardiometabolic and Bone Health: from Fertility to Perimenopause

Grant received by: Oken (HPHC)/Chavarro (HSPH)
Grant number: R01 HD096032
Dates active: 7/10/19 - 4/30/24
Funding Institution: HPHC
When to cite: Mom outcomes at mid-teen visit
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon

Pre- and Perinatal Predictors of Childhood Obesity: Nutrition-Stress Interactions

Grant received by: Monthe-Dreze (BWH)
Grant number: 3R01HD034568-17S1
Dates active: 7/31/19 - 6/30/21
Funding Institution: HPHC
When to cite: Check with Carmen Monthe-Dreze before citing
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon

Center for Stress and Neural Regulation of Reproductive Aging Health Outcomes:  Physiologic and Social Stressors and Health during the Menopausal Transition

Grant received by: Oken (HPHC)/Chavarro (HSPH)
Grant number: 1U54AG062322-01A1
Dates active: 9/1/19-8/31/24
Funding Institution: BWH
When to cite: TBD
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon

Maintain and Enrich Resource Infrastructure for Project Viva: a pre-birth cohort with follow up into adolescence

Grant received by: Oken (HPHC)
Grant number: R24ES030894-01
Dates active: 4/1/20-1/31/25
Funding Institution: HPHC
When to cite: No need to cite
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon

Prenatal and Postnatal Exposure to Environmental Mixtures: Neurodevelopment and DNA Methylation

Grant received by: Cardenas (UC Berkley)/Oken (HPHC)
Grant number: R01ES031259
Dates active: 6/8/20 - 2/8/25
Funding Institution: Berkley
When to cite: Check with Andres Cardenas before citing
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon

Early Life Perfluoroalkyl Substance Exposure & Obesity: Mechanisms & Phenotyping

Grant received by:Braun (Brown)/Oken (HPHC)
Grant number: 5R01ES025214-05
Dates active: 6/24/20 - 1/31/21
Funding Institution: Brown University
When to cite: Check with Joe Braun before citing
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon

Epigenetics, Air Pollution, and Childhood Mental Health

Grant received by: Brunst(UC College of Medicine)/France-Hivert (HPHC)
Grant number: R01ES031054-01A1
Dates active: 7/1/20 - 4/30/25
Funding Institution: U of Cincinnatti
When to cite: Check with Kelly Brunst before citing
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances Mixtures and Maternal Cardiovascular Disease Risk Across the Reproductive Lifecourse

Grant received by: James-Todd (HSPH), Zota (GW)
Grant number: 1R01ES031065 - 01A1
Dates active: 7/1/20 - 6/30/25
Funding Institution: HSPH
When to cite: Check with Tamarra James-Todd before citing
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon

The Home Mycobiome and Childhood Asthma

Grant received by: Sordillo (HPHC)
Grant number: 1R56AI150864-01
Dates active: 9/1/20 - 8/31/21
Funding Institution: HPHC
When to cite: Check with Joanne Sordillo before citing
Objectives, Aims, and Assays coming soon