Harvard Medical SchoolCenter for Palliative Care

PCFHI

(#3524554)

Directors

Eva Chittenden, MD
Kristen Schaefer, MD
J. Andrew Billings, MD
Susan D. Block MD

When

Thursday-Saturday
March 12-14, 2015

Where

The Colonnade Hotel
Boston, MA

Brochure

Download

Tuition

$850 physicians
$700 all others

CMEs

Earn up to 18.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™

In Massachusetts
Opioid Education/Pain Management Credits: A maximum of 5.00
End-of-Life Care Credits: A maximum of 18.75

PCFHI

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PCFHI Schedule

Please note: program changes/substitutions may be made without notice.

Thursday       Friday       Saturday

To read a brief description of the session, please hover over its title.


* – Qualifies in Massachusetts for Risk Management credits in Opioid and Pain Management
All sessions qualify in Massachusetts for Risk Management credits in End-of-Life Care.

 

Thursday – March 12, 2015

 

Time

 

Session Name

Faculty

7:15-8:00   Registration and Breakfast  
8:00-8:15   Announcements  
8:15-9:30 PL1 Plenary: Dealing with Intense Distress in the Setting of Serious Illness Eva Chittenden, MD
Kristen Schaefer, MD
9:30-9:45   Travel Time  
9:45-11:00 1A Management of Challenging Pain in the Hospitalized Patient* (Repeats at 2A) Janet Abrahm, MD
Mihir Kamdar, MD
9:45-11:00 1B Delirium Assessment and Management: Challenges in the Hospital Setting Mary Buss, MD, MPH
9:45-11:00 1C Understanding Hospice: Keys to Successful Referral Stephanie Patel, MD
9:45-11:00 1D Prognostication in the Critically Ill Walter O'Donnell, MD
9:45-11:00 1E Update on Managing End-Stage Congestive Heart Failure Akshay Desai, MD, MPH
11:00-11:15   Break  
11:15-12:30 2A Management of Challenging Pain in the Hospitalized Patient* (Repeats at 1A) Janet Abrahm, MD
Mihir Kamdar, MD
11:15-12:30 2B Never Events in Palliative Care Joshua Lakin, MD
11:15-12:30 2C Ethical Challenges in End-of-Life Care Nicholas Sadovnikoff, MD
11:15-12:30 2D Pain and Symptom Management in the ICU* Judith Nelson, MD, JD
11:15-12:30 2E Imminent Death: Signs, Symptoms, Clinical Management, and Addressing the Family's Acute Grief Vicki Jackson, MD, MPH
12:30-1:30   Lunch on your own  
1:30-2:45 PL2 Plenary: Communication Issues in Serious Advanced Illness Rachelle Bernacki, MD
2:45-3:00   Travel Time  
3:00-4:15 SCE1
and
SCE5
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 1 and 5: Serious Illness Care Program: How to Discuss Values and Goals
Susan Block, MD
Joanna Paladino, MD
Rachelle Bernacki, MD
John Halporn, MD
3:00-4:15 SCE2
and
SCE6
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 2 and 6: Hospice Discussions
Eva Chittenden, MD
Corinne Alexander, MD
Mary Buss, MD, MPH
Todd Hultman, PhD, ACNP, ACHPN
3:00-4:15 SCE3
and
SCE7
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 3 and 7: Negotiating Conflict in the Family Meeting
Andy Billings, MD
Jeffrey Greenwald, MD
Richard Goldstein, MD
Cindy Lien, MD
3:00-4:15 SCE4
and
SCE8
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 4 and 8: The Angry Patient
Kristen Schaefer, MD
Marshall Forstein, MD
Jane deLima Thomas, MD
David Yuppa, MD
4:15-4:45   Break  
4:45-6:00 SCE1
and
SCE5
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 1 and 5: Hospice Discussions
Eva Chittenden, MD
Corinne Alexander, MD
Mary Buss, MD, MPH
Todd Hultman, PhD, ACNP, ACHPN
4:45-6:00 SCE2
and
SCE6
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 2 and 6: Negotiating Conflict in the Family Meeting
Andy Billings, MD
Jeffrey Greenwald, MD
Richard Goldstein, MD
Cindy Lien, MD
4:45-6:00 SCE3
and
SCE7
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 3 and 7: The Angry Patient
Kristen Schaefer, MD
Marshall Forstein, MD
Jane deLima Thomas, MD
David Yuppa, MD
4:45-6:00 SCE4
and
SCE8
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 4 and 8: Serious Illness Care Program: How to Discuss Values and Goals
Susan Block, MD
Joanna Paladino, MD
Rachelle Bernacki, MD
John Halporn, MD
Top      

 

Friday – March 13, 2015

 

Time

 

Session Name

Faculty

7:15-8:00   Breakfast  
8:00-8:15   Announcements  
8:15-9:30 PL3 Plenary: Talking with Surrogates about Values, Prognosis, and Treatment Options Douglas White, MD
9:30-9:45   Travel Time  
9:45-11:00 3A Management of Non-Pain Symptoms: Nausea, Vomiting, Dyspnea, and More (Repeats at 4A) Janet Abrahm, MD
Cindy Lien, MD
9:45-11:00 3B End-stage Dementia: Decision Making and Hospital Management Helen Chen, MD
9:45-11:00 3C Organizing Performance Improvement in the ICU Judith Nelson, MD, JD
9:45-11:00 3D Spirituality in Palliative Care: What the Clinician Needs to Know Tracy Balboni, MD, MPH
9:45-11:00 3E Rehospitalization and the Role of Palliative Care Terrence O'Malley, MD
11:00-11:15   Break  
11:15-12:30 4A Management of Non-Pain Symptoms: Nausea, Vomiting, Dyspnea, and More (Repeats at 3A) Janet Abrahm, MD
Cindy Lien, MD
11:15-12:30 4B Discharge Planning and Effective Transitions in End-of-Life Care: Rehab, Home Care, and Hospice Terrence O'Malley, MD
11:15-12:30 4C Decision Making about Dialysis in the Hospitalized Patient Ernest Mandel, MD
11:15-12:30 4D Responding to Requests from Surrogates for Futile or Potentially Inappropriate Treatments Douglas White, MD
11:15-12:30 4E Assessing Decision-making Capacity Marshall Forstein, MD
12:30-1:30   Lunch on your own  
1:30-2:45 PL4 Plenary: Quality and Patient Safety in End-of-Life Care Tejal Gandhi, MD
2:45-3:00   Travel Time  
3:00-4:15 SCE1
and
SCE5
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 1 and 5: Negotiating Conflict in the Family Meeting
Andy Billings, MD
Jeffrey Greenwald, MD
Richard Goldstein, MD
Cindy Lien, MD
3:00-4:15 SCE2
and
SCE6
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 2 and 6: The Angry Patient
Kristen Schaefer, MD
Marshall Forstein, MD
Jane deLima Thomas, MD
David Yuppa, MD
3:00-4:15 SCE3
and
SCE7
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 3 and 7: Serious Illness Care Program: How to Discuss Values and Goals
Susan Block, MD
Joanna Paladino, MD
Rachelle Bernacki, MD
John Halporn, MD
3:00-4:15 SCE4
and
SCE8
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 4 and 8: Hospice Discussions
Eva Chittenden, MD
Corinne Alexander, MD
Mary Buss, MD, MPH
Todd Hultman, PhD, ACNP, ACHPN
4:15-4:45   Break  
4:45-6:00 SCE1
and
SCE5
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 1 and 5: The Angry Patient
Kristen Schaefer, MD
Marshall Forstein, MD
Jane deLima Thomas, MD
David Yuppa, MD
4:45-6:00 SCE2
and
SCE6
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 2 and 6: Serious Illness Care Program: How to Discuss Values and Goals
Susan Block, MD
Joanna Paladino, MD
Rachelle Bernacki, MD
John Halporn, MD
4:45-6:00 SCE3
and
SCE7
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 3 and 7: Hospice Discussions
Eva Chittenden, MD
Corinne Alexander, MD
Mary Buss, MD, MPH
Todd Hultman, PhD, ACNP, ACHPN
4:45-6:00 SCE4
and
SCE8
Structured Communication Exercise:
Groups 4 and 8: Negotiating Conflict in the Family Meeting
Andy Billings, MD
Jeffrey Greenwald, MD
Richard Goldstein, MD
Cindy Lien, MD
Top      

 

Saturday – March 14, 2015

 

Time

 

Session Name

Faculty

7:15-8:00   Breakfast  
8:00-8:15   Announcements  
8:15-9:30 PL5 Plenary: Collaborating with Surgeons in Caring for Seriously Ill Patients Zara Cooper, MD
9:30-9:45   Travel Time  
9:45-11:00 5A Cultural and Spiritual Factors Affecting Care of Patients with Serious, Life-Threatening Illness Marshall Forstein, MD
9:45-11:00 5B Decoding Code Status Discussions Eva Chittenden, MD
9:45-11:00 5C Dealing with the "Difficult" Patient: Psychosocial Diagnosis and Management Guy Maytal, MD
9:45-11:00 5D Psychiatric Issues in Patients with Advanced Disease David Yuppa, MD
9:45-11:00 5E Reflecting on End of Life through Poetry Amy Ship, MD
11:00-11:15   Break  
11:15-12:30 PL6 Concluding Plenary: Chronic Critical Illness: Strategies for Improving Care Judith Nelson, MD, JD
Top      
5E: During this interactive workshop, together we'll read several poems that address death and dying to explore how literature can "open up" discussions of challenging issues in palliative care.
5D: This session will broadly cover the key psychiatric issues faced in the management of individuals with advanced diseases. Key topics include an overview of diagnosis and management of delirium, adjustment disorder, clinical anxiety and depressive disorder, and existential distress. Other topics include, personality disorders, suicide, and the concept of "desire for hastened death."
5B: In this interactive session, we will briefly review the historic context of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, followed by current survival statistics after inpatient CPR. We will discuss possible outcomes of a code blue, including death immediately or after an ICU course; and survival with or without return to prior functional or cognitive level. Barriers, including clinician discomfort, lack of training and time pressures, will be addressed. Finally, we will discuss best practices in code status discussions and brainstorm ways to improve these conversations, both from individual clinician and systems perspectives.
5A: This session will address the cultural and spiritual aspects of caring for people with life threatening illness. Participants will be asked to discuss cases from their clinical work in which cultural and/or spiritual concerns affect the course of treatment and decision making.
4E: This session will define Capacity as a clinical determination with attention of the mental status changes that undermine a patient's ability make informed choices about his/her care. Using a few cases, participants will apply criteria by which Decision Making Capacity is determined.
4D: This session will address how individual clinicians and health systems can ethically and effectively respond to requests from surrogates for futile or potentially inappropriate treatment. The first portion will focus on communication strategies to prevent intractable conflicts. The second portion will present soon-to-be-released consensus guidelines for managing intractable disputes using a fair process of conflict resolution.
4B: This session will review the clinical capabilities of a range of post acute care options from hospital to home with specific attention to the impact of advanced directives on the choice of site.
4A: This session will focus on the treatment of common non-pain symptoms including nausea, dyspnea, cough, and pruritus. Each symptom will be presented in a clinical case to highlight practical management strategies.
2A: This session will help hospitalists and intensivists optimize their skill set for the management of complex inpatient pain issues. Using a case-based format to cover topics ranging from the pain evaluation, use of parenteral analgesics, opioid conversion, management of pain crises, and the differences in approach to acute vs. chronic vs. cancer pain, the participant will leave the session with a greater practical understanding of the inpatient pain management.
3E: This session will review three models of readmission reduction emphasizing specific issues relating to patients with life limiting conditions.
3D: This session will describe the impact of religion/spirituality in serious illness, including quality of life end-of-life outcomes and end of life medical decision making, and describe the basics of spiritual care guidelines, spiritual assessment, and multidisciplinary spiritual care provision.
3C: This session will provide a structured framework for organizing a palliative care performance improvement effort in the ICU that can succeed and endure.
3B: This session will highlight how hospitalized patients with dementia present special challenges to the inpatient clinical teams.
3A: This session will focus on the treatment of common non-pain symptoms including nausea, dyspnea, cough, and pruritus. Each symptom will be presented in a clinical case to highlight practical management strategies.
2E: 1. Describe basic symptom management for the imminently dying patient. 2. Understand the clinical evidence available for treatments at the very end-of-life. 3. Appreciate concerns that family members of the dying patient have.
2D: This session will highlight common challenges, recommended approaches, and evidentiary gaps related to management of pain and symptoms in the ICU.
2B: This session will provide an overview of the Never Events and Choosing Wisely concepts in quality improvement, specifically in the context of palliative care. Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to use these concepts and elements to consider structuring quality improvement initiatives around palliative care for their own practice.
1E: This session will focus on a review of the approach to management of advanced heart failure and the opportunities for integration of palliative care into the management of patients with end-stage disease.
1C: 1. Understand the basic services that hospice provides. 2. Acknowledge the barriers and myths often associated with Hospice Care. 3. Learn basic criteria for hospice eligibility.
1B: This session will examine the impact on delirium on patients and caregivers from a palliative care perspective and discuss treatment strategies, using both illustrative cases and a critical review of the literature.
1A: This session will help hospitalists and intensivists optimize their skill set for the management of complex inpatient pain issues. Using a case-based format to cover topics ranging from the pain evaluation, use of parenteral analgesics, opioid conversion, management of pain crises, and the differences in approach to acute vs. chronic vs. cancer pain, the participant will leave the session with a greater practical understanding of the inpatient pain management.
This session will acknowledge patient interactions in which anger is a predominant emotion expressed. Strategies discussed for identifying the meaning of the anger and how to approach the angry patient/family will use real cases examples from the participants.
This session will acknowledge patient interactions in which anger is a predominant emotion expressed. Strategies discussed for identifying the meaning of the anger and how to approach the angry patient/family will use real cases examples from the participants.
This session will acknowledge patient interactions in which anger is a predominant emotion expressed. Strategies discussed for identifying the meaning of the anger and how to approach the angry patient/family will use real cases examples from the participants.
This session will acknowledge patient interactions in which anger is a predominant emotion expressed. Strategies discussed for identifying the meaning of the anger and how to approach the angry patient/family will use real cases examples from the participants.
This session will acknowledge patient interactions in which anger is a predominant emotion expressed. Strategies discussed for identifying the meaning of the anger and how to approach the angry patient/family will use real cases examples from the participants.
This session will acknowledge patient interactions in which anger is a predominant emotion expressed. Strategies discussed for identifying the meaning of the anger and how to approach the angry patient/family will use real cases examples from the participants.
This session will acknowledge patient interactions in which anger is a predominant emotion expressed. Strategies discussed for identifying the meaning of the anger and how to approach the angry patient/family will use real cases examples from the participants.
This session will acknowledge patient interactions in which anger is a predominant emotion expressed. Strategies discussed for identifying the meaning of the anger and how to approach the angry patient/family will use real cases examples from the participants.
In this session we discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses as they approach the end of life by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
In this session we discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses as they approach the end of life by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
In this session we discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses as they approach the end of life by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
In this session we discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses as they approach the end of life by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
In this session we discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses as they approach the end of life by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
In this session we discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses as they approach the end of life by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
In this session we discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses as they approach the end of life by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
In this session we discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses as they approach the end of life by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
This session will provide skills in conducting a family meeting is an essential palliative care competence, though rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
This session will provide skills in conducting a family meeting is an essential palliative care competence, though rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
This session will provide skills in conducting a family meeting is an essential palliative care competence, though rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
This session will provide skills in conducting a family meeting is an essential palliative care competence, though rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
This session will provide skills in conducting a family meeting is an essential palliative care competence, though rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
This session will provide skills in conducting a family meeting is an essential palliative care competence, though rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
This session will provide skills in conducting a family meeting is an essential palliative care competence, though rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
This session will provide skills in conducting a family meeting is an essential palliative care competence, though rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
Discussing hospice with patients with terminal illness is an important skill, which requires an understanding of the hospice benefit and philosophy, as well as willingness and ability to discuss prognosis with a patient. In this interactive, skill-building session, we will review best practices in these domains.
Discussing hospice with patients with terminal illness is an important skill, which requires an understanding of the hospice benefit and philosophy, as well as willingness and ability to discuss prognosis with a patient. In this interactive, skill-building session, we will review best practices in these domains.
Discussing hospice with patients with terminal illness is an important skill, which requires an understanding of the hospice benefit and philosophy, as well as willingness and ability to discuss prognosis with a patient. In this interactive, skill-building session, we will review best practices in these domains.
Discussing hospice with patients with terminal illness is an important skill, which requires an understanding of the hospice benefit and philosophy, as well as willingness and ability to discuss prognosis with a patient. In this interactive, skill-building session, we will review best practices in these domains.
Discussing hospice with patients with terminal illness is an important skill, which requires an understanding of the hospice benefit and philosophy, as well as willingness and ability to discuss prognosis with a patient. In this interactive, skill-building session, we will review best practices in these domains.
Discussing hospice with patients with terminal illness is an important skill, which requires an understanding of the hospice benefit and philosophy, as well as willingness and ability to discuss prognosis with a patient. In this interactive, skill-building session, we will review best practices in these domains.
Discussing hospice with patients with terminal illness is an important skill, which requires an understanding of the hospice benefit and philosophy, as well as willingness and ability to discuss prognosis with a patient. In this interactive, skill-building session, we will review best practices in these domains.
Discussing hospice with patients with terminal illness is an important skill, which requires an understanding of the hospice benefit and philosophy, as well as willingness and ability to discuss prognosis with a patient. In this interactive, skill-building session, we will review best practices in these domains.
PL6: This session will focus on the formidable challenges presented by chronic critical illness for patients, families, clinicians, hospitals, and the health care system as a whole.
PL4: This session will provide an overview of new directions in patient safety and how they are relevant to end of life care, as well as describe current challenges and opportunities to improve quality and safety at the end of life.
PL3: This session will present a framework for effectively engaging surrogate decision makers in ICUs. The speaker will summarize existing problems with surrogate decision making in hospitalized patients and suggest communication strategies to overcome these problems.
PL2: In this session we discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses as they approach the end of life by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
PL1: This session will include an interview of a patient and/or family member and large group discussion.