Harvard Medical SchoolCenter for Palliative Care

PAPC

(#732740-1801)

Directors

Kristen G. Schaefer, MD
Eva H. Chittenden, MD

When

Wednesday-Friday
September 13-15, 2017

Where

Colonnade Hotel
Boston, MA

Postcard

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Tuition

$895 physicians
$795 residents, nurses, allied health professionals
$695 social workers, chaplains

CMEs

Earn up to 18.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™

In Massachusetts
Opioid Education/Pain Management Credits: A maximum of 6.25
End-of-Life Care Credits: A maximum of 18.75

CNEs

PENDING: A maximum of 18.75 Continuing Nursing Education hours will be awarded.

CEs

PENDING: A maximum of 18.75 Social Work CEs will be awarded.

PAPC

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PAPC Schedule

Please note: program changes/substitutions may be made without notice.

Wednesday       Thursday       Friday

To read a brief description of the session, please hover over its title.
To download a copy of the schedule, please click here.

*
Qualifies for Opioid Education and Pain Management Training credits.
°
Qualifies for End-of-Life Care Education credits.
This activity covers topics required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to be included in continuing professional development programs that physicians registered with the state's Medical Use of Marijuana Program must complete as a condition to issuing written certifications to qualifying patients.
  Please check your individual state licensing board's requirements before claiming Risk Management credits.

 

 

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

 

Time

 

Session

Faculty

7:15-8:00   Registration and Breakfast  
8:00-8:30   Welcome, Course Introduction, and Overview of the Day Eva H. Chittenden, MD
Kristen G. Schaefer, MD
8:30-9:45 PL1 Changing the Culture and Systems of Medicine to Improve Advance Care Planning Susan D. Block, MD
9:45-10:00   Break  
10:00-11:15   Breakout Session 1 (Choose One)  
  1A Using the Serious Illness Care Guide° (Part 1 of 2, must take both parts, 1A/2A; Repeats at 3A/4A) Joshua R. Lakin, MD
Rachelle Bernacki, MD, MS
Justin J. Sanders, MD, MSc
  1B Pharmacotherapy of Pain* (Repeats at 2B) Elizabeth M. Rickerson, MD
Bridget C. Scullion, PharmD, BCOP
  1C Spiritual Care of Patients with Advanced Illness: Associations with Quality of Death and Medical Care at the End of Life° (Repeats at 2C) Tracy Balboni, MD, MPH
Katrina M. Scott, MDiv, BCC-HPCC
  1D Home-based Palliative Care° (Repeats at 2D) Julia M. Gallagher, MD
Martha A. Quigley, MS, GNP-BC, ACHPN
  1E Decoding Code Status Discussions° (Repeats at 2E) Julia Ragland, MD
  1F Depression and Anxiety in Palliative Care° (Repeats at 2F) David P. Yuppa, MD
  1G Can't We All Just Get Along?: Conflict Resolution in Palliative Care (Repeats at 2G) Lynn Mazur, MSW, LICSW
Alison Rhodes, ACNP-BC, ACHPN
Erica Wilson, MD
  1H Ask the Professor: Challenging Psychosocial Cases Susan D. Block, MD
11:15-11:30   Break  
11:30-12:45   Breakout Session 2 (Choose One)  
  2A Using the Serious Illness Care Guide° (Part 2 of 2, must take both parts, 1A/2A; Repeats at 3A/4A) Joshua R. Lakin, MD
Rachelle Bernacki, MD, MS
Justin J. Sanders, MD, MSc
  2B Pharmacotherapy of Pain* (Repeats at 1B) Elizabeth M. Rickerson, MD
Bridget C. Scullion, PharmD, BCOP
  2C Spiritual Care of Patients with Advanced Illness: Associations with Quality of Death and Medical Care at the End of Life° (Repeats at 1C) Tracy Balboni, MD, MPH
Katrina M. Scott, MDiv, BCC-HPCC
  2D Home-based Palliative Care° (Repeats at 1D) Julia M. Gallagher, MD
Martha A. Quigley, MS, GNP-BC, ACHPN
  2E Decoding Code Status Discussions° (Repeats at 1E) Leah B. Rosenberg, MD
  2F Depression and Anxiety in Palliative Care° (Repeats at 1F) David P. Yuppa, MD
  2G Can't We All Just Get Along?: Conflict Resolution in Palliative Care (Repeats at 1G) Lynn Mazur, MSW, LICSW
Alison Rhodes, ACNP-BC, ACHPN
Erica Wilson, MD
  2H Talking about Serious News° (Repeats at 4G) Andrew J. Lawton, MD
Barbara Reville, DNP, CNP, ACHPN
Kristen G. Schaefer, MD
12:45-1:45   Lunch on Your Own  
1:45-3:00 PL2 Will You Still Need Me, Will You Still Feed Me, When I'm 104? Improving Palliative Care for Older Adults° Helen Chen, MD
Erin Stevens, DO
3:00-3:15   Break  
3:15-4:30   Breakout Session 3 (Choose One)  
  3A Using the Serious Illness Care Guide° (Part 1 of 2, must take both parts, 3A/4A; Repeats at 1A/2A) Joshua R. Lakin, MD
Rachelle Bernacki, MD, MS
Justin J. Sanders, MD, MSc
  3B Case-based Presentation of Non-Pain Symptoms in Palliative Care° (Repeats at 4B) Bethany-Rose Daubman, MD
Cindy Lien, MD
  3C "Difficult" Families° (Repeats at 4C) Guy Maytal, MD
  3D Case-based Ethical Dilemmas° (Repeats at 4D) Ellen M. Robinson, RN, PhD
  3E Opioid Misuse and Addiction in Palliative Care* (Repeats at 4E) Lida Nabati, MD
Claudia P. Rodriguez, MD
  3F Managing Neuropathic Pain* (Repeats at 4F) Mihir M. Kamdar, MD
  3G Identifying Opportunities for Collaboration between Oncology and Palliative Care° Janet L. Abrahm, MD
Tracy Balboni, MD, MPH
  3H Challenges in the Management of Advanced Dementia° Helen Chen, MD
4:30-4:45   Break  
4:45-6:00   Breakout Session 4 (Choose One)  
  4A Using the Serious Illness Care Guide° (Part 2 of 2, must take both parts, 3A/4A; Repeats at 1A/2A) Joshua R. Lakin, MD
Rachelle Bernacki, MD, MS
Justin J. Sanders, MD, MSc
  4B Case-based Presentation of Non-Pain Symptoms in Palliative Care° (Repeats at 3B) Bethany-Rose Daubman, MD
Cindy Lien, MD
  4C "Difficult" Families° (Repeats at 3C) Guy Maytal, MD
  4D Case-based Ethical Dilemmas° (Repeats at 3D) Ellen M. Robinson, RN, PhD
  4E Opioid Misuse and Addiction in Palliative Care* (Repeats at 3E) Lida Nabati, MD
Claudia P. Rodriguez, MD
  4F Managing Neuropathic Pain* (Repeats at 3F) Mihir M. Kamdar, MD
  4G Talking about Serious News° (Repeats at 2H) Andrew J. Lawton, MD
Barbara Reville, DNP, CNP, ACHPN
Kristen G. Schaefer, MD
  4H Living with Cancer: A Step-by-Step Guide for Coping Medically and Emotionally with a Serious Diagnosis° Vicki A. Jackson, MD, MPH

 

Thursday, September 14, 2017

 

Time

 

Session

Faculty

7:15-8:00   Breakfast  
8:00-8:15   Overview of the Day Eva H. Chittenden, MD
Kristen G. Schaefer, MD
8:15-9:30 PL3 Working with Referrers to Help Patients Cultivate Prognostic Awareness° Vicki A. Jackson, MD, MPH
9:30-9:45   Break  
9:45-11:00   Breakout Session 5 (Choose One)  
  5A When a Patient Just Can't Talk about It: A Dual Framework to Focus on Living and Tolerate the Possibility of Dying° (Repeats at 6A) Juliet Jacobsen, MD, DPH
Vicki Jackson, MD, MPH
  5B Making Work Sustainable (Repeats at 6B) Catherine G. Arnold, MSW, LICSW
Amanda Moment, MSW, LICSW
  5C Delirium at the End of Life: Impact on Patients and Caregivers° (Repeats at 6C) Mary K. Buss, MD, MPH
  5D Care of Patients with Advanced Cardiac Disease° (Repeats at 6D) Akshay Desai, MD, MPH
  5E ABCs of Hospice° (Repeats at 6E) Mary E. Barry, RN, MSM, CHPN, CHPCA
Stephanie Patel, MD
  5F Palliative Care Emergencies° (Repeats at 6F) Lara Michal Skarf, MD
Jordana Meyerson, MD
  5G Mind/Body Medicine in Palliative Care° (Repeats at 6G) Darshan Hemendra Mehta, MD, MPH
Giselle Perez-Lougee, PhD
  5H Psychological Challenges in the Care of Young Adults° Karen Fasciano, PsyD
11:00-11:15   Break  
11:15-12:30   Breakout Session 6 (Choose One)  
  6A When a Patient Just Can't Talk about It: A Dual Framework to Focus on Living and Tolerate the Possibility of Dying° (Repeats at 5A) Juliet Jacobsen, MD, DPH
Vicki Jackson, MD, MPH
  6B Making Work Sustainable (Repeats at 5B) Catherine G. Arnold, MSW, LICSW
Amanda Moment, MSW, LICSW
  6C Delirium at the End of Life: Impact on Patients and Caregivers° (Repeats at 5C) Mary K. Buss, MD, MPH
  6D Care of Patients with Advanced Cardiac Disease° (Repeats at 5D) Akshay Desai, MD, MPH
  6E ABCs of Hospice° (Repeats at 5E) Mary E. Barry, RN, MSM, CHPN, CHPCA
Stephanie Patel, MD
  6F Palliative Care Emergencies° (Repeats at 5F) Lara Michal Skarf, MD
Jordana Meyerson, MD
  6G Mind/Body Medicine in Palliative Care° (Repeats at 5G) Darshan Hemendra Mehta, MD, MPH
Giselle Perez-Lougee, PhD
  6H Palliative Care through a Population Management Lens Rachelle E. Bernacki, MD, MS
12:30-1:30   Lunch on Your Own  
1:30-2:45 PL4 Addressing Primary Palliative Care Workforce Shortages: A New Educational Model Constance Dahlin, MSN, ANP-BC, ACHPN, FPCN, FAAN
2:45-3:00   Break  
3:00-4:15   Breakout Session 7 (Choose One)  
  7A A Novel Approach to Late Goals of Care Conversations: REMAP° (Repeats at 8A) James A. Tulsky, MD
  7B Taking a Stance on Physician Aid in Dying° (Repeats at 8B) Constance Dahlin, MSN, ANP-BC, ACHPN, FPCN, FAAN
  7C Interventional Approaches to Pain Management* (Repeats at 8C) Mihir M. Kamdar, MD
Elizabeth M. Rickerson, MD
  7D Negotiating Conflict in the Family Meeting° (Repeats at 8D) John D. Halporn, MD
Bruce MacDonald, MSW, LICSW
Jane deLima Thomas, MD
  7E End-stage Kidney Disease Treatment Decisions in Vulnerable Patients: A Palliative Approach° (Repeats at 8E) Robert A. Cohen, MD, MSc
  7F Reflecting on End of Life through Poetry° Amy Ship, MD
  7G Practical Aspects of Pediatric Palliative Care° Shih-Ning Liaw, MD
  7H Working with Medical Interpreters in Palliative Care Janet L. Abrahm, MD
Jessica Goldhirsch, LCSW, MSW, MPH
4:15-4:30   Break  
4:30-5:45   Breakout Session 8 (Choose One)  
  8A A Novel Approach to Late Goals of Care Conversations: REMAP° (Repeats at 7A) James A. Tulsky, MD
  8B Taking a Stance on Physician Aid in Dying° (Repeats at 7B) Constance Dahlin, MSN, ANP-BC, ACHPN, FPCN, FAAN
  8C Interventional Approaches to Pain Management* (Repeats at 7C) Mihir M. Kamdar, MD
Elizabeth M. Rickerson, MD
  8D Negotiating Conflict in the Family Meeting° (Repeats at 7D) John D. Halporn, MD
Bruce MacDonald, MSW, LICSW
Jane deLima Thomas, MD
  8E End-stage Kidney Disease Treatment Decisions in Vulnerable Patients: A Palliative Approach° (Repeats at 7E) Robert A. Cohen, MD, MSc
  8F Ask the Professor: Challenging Symptom Management Cases Janet L. Abrahm, MD
  8G Managing Fatigue in Cancer Patients° Carlos Fernandez-Robles, MD
  8H Working on an Inpatient Palliative Care Unit: Life on the Ground Day to Day° Kate J. Baccari, MS, PA-C
Linda Drury, BS, PA-C
Courtney Moller, MS, PA-C

 

Friday, September 15, 2017

 

Time

 

Session

Faculty

7:15-8:00   Breakfast  
8:00-8:15   Overview of the Day Eva H. Chittenden, MD
Kristen G. Schaefer, MD
8:15-9:30 PL5 Bereavement Interview and Structured Debrief° Sue E. Morris, PsyD
9:30-9:45   Break  
9:45-11:00   Breakout Session 9 (Choose One)  
  9A End-of-Life Beliefs and Practices from Different Religious Perspectives: A Panel Presentation° Gloria Elaine White-Hammond, MD, MDiv
  9B Palliative Care Challenges in Advanced Lung Disease° Jessica B. McCannon, MD
  9C Palliative Care Consultation in the Nursing Home Robert Warren, MD
Catherine M. Duffy, APRN-BC
  9D Medical Marijuana: Cannabinoid Pharmacology, Review of Scientific Evidence, and Suggestions for Clinical Practice† Lida Nabati, MD
  9E Legislative Initiatives to Address the Opioid Crisis* Douglas E. Brandoff, MD
  9F Cognitive Behavior Techniques for Fostering Clinician Resilience Barbara Reville, DNP, CNP, ACHPN
Diana L. Dill, EdD
  9G Existential Distress, Demoralization, and Dignity° David P. Yuppa, MD
  9H Best Practices in Bereavement Care° Sue E. Morris, PsyD
11:00-11:15   Break  
11:15-12:30 PL6 Taking it Home James A. Tulsky, MD
12:30-12:35   Wrap Up Eva H. Chittenden, MD
Kristen G. Schaefer, MD
PL6: Taking it Home
9H: This session will provide an overview of the nature of grief from a psychological perspective. Guidelines and practical strategies for providing bereavement care will be outlined.
9G: This session will focus on the topics of existential distress, demoralization, and dignity as they pertain to the treatment of patients with serious, life-threatening illness.
9F: This session will address how sexuality is a vital quality of life issue for patients and partners that is often under-addressed in a palliative care context.
9E: This session will update participants on both local and more broad opioid regulations affecting patients, clinicians, dispensers, and payers. Through didactic teaching and participant discussion, we will also review the Massachusetts experience as a case study for legislative involvement in the opioid crisis. Participants are strongly encouraged to come prepared with cases and/or questions in which they have encountered challenges in delivering patient care due to newer opioid regulations.
9D: This session will review the cannabinoid pharmacology, current state of scientific literature relating to medical marijuana, and considerations for clinical practice including substance abuse concerns. It will also review federal and state-level regulation regarding its use.
9C: This session will focus on the challenges and successes of providing patient centered palliative and hospice care in the long term care setting. Integration of a palliative care service in a nursing facility encounters numerous challenges. These include nursing home residents with multiple complex illnesses often with an unpredictable prognostic course, financial issues surrounding payment, and federal and state regulations making quality symptom management difficult.
9B: Palliative Care Challenges in Advanced Lung Disease
9A: Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to: To learn about practices pertinent to death and dying within different faith traditions that speak; To hear clergy persons share their personal experiences with death and dying among their congregants; To learn how their approaches to death and dying may have evolved over the years; To hear how clergy would like more support from members of the medical community.
PL5: In this session, a bereaved family member of a patient who died recently will be interviewed by an experienced clinician to explore the experience of the bereaved person with the patient's end-of-life care, the phenomenology of early bereavement, and clinical approaches to supporting people in the early stages of grief.
8H: This session will present an interactive question and answer format using case studies to describe the day to day functioning of an inpatient palliative care team. A stable group of Physician Assistants, who have worked together for several years with very little turnover, share their experiences as the primary responding medical team working on an inpatient unit, providing symptom management to patients at every stage of their cancer course, from those undergoing curative treatments, to those at end of life. We will explore the logistics of day to day functioning, the challenges of working within a large academic medical center with multiple disciplines, and the idea of compassion fatigue and how to prevent it.
8G: This session will cover the evaluation and management of fatigue in patients with cancer. Latest recommendations for interventions and strategies to implement them will also be discussed.
8F: This session will be a case-based discussion using challenging cases supplied by audience members. For each case, we will discuss the elements that make the case challenging, the heuristic(s) that would be useful, the pathophysiology if relevant, the aspects of suffering manifested by the case, the team approach to understanding that suffering, and to resolving it when possible and appropriate. Audience members will be invited to participate in the discussion of others' cases as well as their own.
8E: End-stage kidney disease is associated with heightened morbidity and mortality. This session will provide prognostic information and tools that assist with identifying those at highest risk for doing poorly with the approach of end-stage kidney disease and the treatment options to consider for such patients. Additionally, it will address approaches for conducting conversations with such individuals that promote the likelihood that treatment decisions take into account patient values and preferences.
8D: This session will provide knowledge and skills on the conduct of a family meeting. This is an essential palliative care competency, although it is rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
8C: This session will help participants understand the background and rationale for pain interventions in palliative care and cancer pain patients. We will focus on the importance of a pain diagnosis and discuss the risks and benefits of interventions in a population that is generally much sicker than the typical chronic pain population.
8B: With the legalization of physician aid in dying in California, (PAD) is a legally sanctioned option for one sixth of the US population. Patients are increasingly expressing interest in PAD as part of their care. Because of the complex professional and ethical challenges, clinicians must be prepared for information concerning hastened death and requests for PAD. This session will explore physician aid in dying and potential responses, including mobilization of the best possible interdisciplinary palliative care.
8A: This session will introduce a "talking map" to guide clinicians through goals of care conversations. We will identify common pearls and pitfalls, and use a series of fun drills to practice common phrases and responses to difficult questions.
7H: This session will describe language and cultural barriers faced by limited English proficient patients at end of life and the benefits of pairing with a professional medical interpreter to prevent or reduce such disparities. The session will also provide participants with knowledge and skills for effectively working with professional medical interpreters.
7G: This session will provide an overview of pediatric palliative care, highlighting epidemiological considerations, strategies for communication, and approaches to symptom management.
7F: This session will be a facilitated discussion of poems that, in some way, address end of life. Together, participants will reflect on and explore collectively the complex issues they address associated with palliative care and end-of-life care.
7E: End-stage kidney disease is associated with heightened morbidity and mortality. This session will provide prognostic information and tools that assist with identifying those at highest risk for doing poorly with the approach of end-stage kidney disease and the treatment options to consider for such patients. Additionally, it will address approaches for conducting conversations with such individuals that promote the likelihood that treatment decisions take into account patient values and preferences.
7D: This session will provide knowledge and skills on the conduct of a family meeting. This is an essential palliative care competency, although it is rarely taught. In this exercise, we will consider indications for this common procedure, create a map for a structured approach to leading a meeting, especially when conflict is present, and practice key skills.
7C: This session will help participants understand the background and rationale for pain interventions in palliative care and cancer pain patients. We will focus on the importance of a pain diagnosis and discuss the risks and benefits of interventions in a population that is generally much sicker than the typical chronic pain population.
7B: With the legalization of physician aid in dying in California, (PAD) is a legally sanctioned option for one sixth of the US population. Patients are increasingly expressing interest in PAD as part of their care. Because of the complex professional and ethical challenges, clinicians must be prepared for information concerning hastened death and requests for PAD. This session will explore physician aid in dying and potential responses, including mobilization of the best possible interdisciplinary palliative care.
7A: This session will introduce a "talking map" to guide clinicians through goals of care conversations. We will identify common pearls and pitfalls, and use a series of fun drills to practice common phrases and responses to difficult questions.
PL4: Within various conditions and serious illness, palliative care is increasingly becoming an expected element of the care plan. However, with the shortage of palliative care specialists, it is essential to promote primary palliative care. This session will explore various interdisciplinary educational opportunities to support professional development in primary palliative care.
6H: This session will discuss collaboration with population health management (PHM) and the intersections with palliative care, focusing on two specific programs as examples.
6G: This session will introduce participants to several mind/body medicine techniques and will describe numerous studies illuminating the benefits of mind/body medicine strategies.
6F: This session will review practical management strategies for common urgent and emergent medical conditions that arise in a palliative care setting, including: seizures, catastrophic hemorrhage, a pain crisis, opioid-induced neurotoxicity and spinal cord compression.
6E: This session will review the philosophy behind hospice care, the basic eligibility criteria as well as review the myths and misconceptions which lead to barriers to referring patients to hospice.
6D: Care of Patients with Advanced Cardiac Disease
6C: Delirium is a highly prevalent and highly distressing condition for patients and their families in any setting, but especially as patients approach the end of life. This session will review predisposing and precipitating factors for delirium, introduce a variety of assessment tools to facilitate diagnosis and provide an evidence-based approach to the treatment, including both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic strategies.
6B: Creating a sustainable work-life balance is an ongoing, iterative process that requires self-reflection and monitoring. In this interactive session, we will explore ways in which we can work toward greater sustainability in our practice and in our lives.
6A: This session aims to help outpatient clinicians working with seriously ill patients who are ambivalent, uncomfortable, or fearful of further discussion about the future. A dual framework that focuses on living and acknowledges dying, equips clinicians to help patients live as fully as possible while also preparing for end of life.
5H: This session will focus on the unique issues that young adults with life threatening illness encounter including developmental disruptions, altered life goals, threats to body integrity, and high levels of emotional distress. Participants will also be presented with common professional challenges in caring for these young patients, as well as strategies to increase developmental competence in their care delivery.
5G: This session will introduce participants to several mind/body medicine techniques and will describe numerous studies illuminating the benefits of mind/body medicine strategies.
5F: This session will review practical management strategies for common urgent and emergent medical conditions that arise in a palliative care setting, including: seizures, catastrophic hemorrhage, a pain crisis, opioid-induced neurotoxicity and spinal cord compression.
5E: This session will review the philosophy behind hospice care, the basic eligibility criteria as well as review the myths and misconceptions which lead to barriers to referring patients to hospice.
5D: Care of Patients with Advanced Cardiac Disease
5C: Delirium is a highly prevalent and highly distressing condition for patients and their families in any setting, but especially as patients approach the end of life. This session will review predisposing and precipitating factors for delirium, introduce a variety of assessment tools to facilitate diagnosis and provide an evidence-based approach to the treatment, including both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic strategies.
5B: Creating a sustainable work-life balance is an ongoing, iterative process that requires self-reflection and monitoring. In this interactive session, we will explore ways in which we can work toward greater sustainability in our practice and in our lives.
5A: This session aims to help outpatient clinicians working with seriously ill patients who are ambivalent, uncomfortable, or fearful of further discussion about the future. A dual framework that focuses on living and acknowledges dying, equips clinicians to help patients live as fully as possible while also preparing for end of life.
PL3: Estimating and communicating prognosis are core skills in palliative care. This session will review reasons prognostication is vital, methods of estimating prognosis, and approaches to communicating prognosis with seriously ill patients and family members.
4H: Living with Cancer: A Step-by-Step Guide for Coping Medically and Emotionally with a Serious Diagnosis
4G: This session will provide a small group environment facilitated by a physician-nurse team in which participant interaction will support learning. Recognizing that serious illness discussions with patients are laden with emotionality and clinician stress, the facilitators will model communication behaviors and support participants during role play using practical strategies for broaching discussions of patient fears, hopes, goals and wishes for care at the end of life.
4F: This session will be an interactive didactic that will provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review of neuropathic pain. The lecture will cover topics ranging from the basic science mechanisms that sustain neuropathic pain to the practical use of analgesic targeting neural pain.
4E: This session will review the spectrum of substance use problems seen in the palliative care setting. One of the greatest challenges for the palliative care provider is managing patients with pain and concurrent substance misuse, particularly when the misused substance is the opioids prescribed for pain. We will review strategies to identify and manage patients with opioid misuse or at high risk for opioid misuse. We will also review how to manage pain in patients taking methadone or buprenorphine for opioid dependence.
4D: This session will focus on complex ethical dilemmas that arise in palliative care. Cases that embody complexities in the following areas will be presented and discussed: Relevance of the doctrine of double effect; Questions related to whether there is an ethical distinction between treatments that may be withheld versus withdrawn; and Surrogate insistence for continued life sustaining treatment.
4C: This session will summarize the nature of family structures and dynamics that arise in palliative medicine settings. The session will also present methods and approaches to operating clinically when a family's behavior towards and understanding of clinical care does not match the mainstream expectations in medical practice.
4B: This session will be a case-based presentation which reviews differential diagnosis and management of some non-pain symptoms commonly seen in Palliative Care such as nausea, dyspnea, bowel obstruction and fatigue.
4A: This session will discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
3H: This session will describe gaps in care and potential interventions for the increasing need for palliative care given the aging of our populations in the coming decades.
3G: This session will utilize case studies to highlight the role of palliative cancer therapies in patients with advanced malignancies; goals of care and quality of life; and using effective communication strategies between oncology providers and palliative care to assure continuity of care.
3F: This session will be an interactive didactic that will provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review of neuropathic pain. The lecture will cover topics ranging from the basic science mechanisms that sustain neuropathic pain to the practical use of analgesic targeting neural pain.
3E: This session will review the spectrum of substance use problems seen in the palliative care setting. One of the greatest challenges for the palliative care provider is managing patients with pain and concurrent substance misuse, particularly when the misused substance is the opioids prescribed for pain. We will review strategies to identify and manage patients with opioid misuse or at high risk for opioid misuse. We will also review how to manage pain in patients taking methadone or buprenorphine for opioid dependence.
3D: This session will focus on complex ethical dilemmas that arise in palliative care. Cases that embody complexities in the following areas will be presented and discussed: Relevance of the doctrine of double effect; Questions related to whether there is an ethical distinction between treatments that may be withheld versus withdrawn; and Surrogate insistence for continued life sustaining treatment.
3C: This session will summarize the nature of family structures and dynamics that arise in palliative medicine settings. The session will also present methods and approaches to operating clinically when a family's behavior towards and understanding of clinical care does not match the mainstream expectations in medical practice.
3B: This session will be a case-based presentation which reviews differential diagnosis and management of some non-pain symptoms commonly seen in Palliative Care such as nausea, dyspnea, bowel obstruction and fatigue.
3A: This session will discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
PL2: This session will describe gaps in care and potential interventions for the increasing need for palliative care given the aging of our populations in the coming decades.
2H: This session will provide a small group environment facilitated by a physician-nurse team in which participant interaction will support learning. Recognizing that serious illness discussions with patients are laden with emotionality and clinician stress, the facilitators will model communication behaviors and support participants during role play using practical strategies for broaching discussions of patient fears, hopes, goals and wishes for care at the end of life.
2G: A hallmark of palliative care is the interdisciplinary team process. Given the challenges of developing a plan of care for patients with serious illness, there are times when conflict may arise within the palliative care team or across teams providing care to the patient. A model of conflict resolution based on shared values and ethics across disciplines can help to constructively resolve such conflicts. Understanding the various styles of conflict resolution can aid interdisciplinary team members in navigating these challenging conversations with colleagues.
2F: This session will focus on the assessment, differential diagnosis, and management recommendations of depression and anxiety in the palliative care setting. Special attention will be paid to the unique clinical scenarios and specialized pharmacology of the palliative care patient. Less focus will be given to a detailed exploration of the various modes of psychotherapy applicable to this patient population.
2E: In this interactive session we will critically assess current practices related to code status discussions including identification of appropriate patients, timing of discussions and common challenges encountered. We will review the likely outcomes of in-hospital CPR and discuss strategies and communication pointers for effective code status discussions.
2D: This session will provide a general overview of the different organizational and staffing models for home-based palliative care including frequently encountered administrative and operational challenges posed by each model and; use patient vignettes from our own program to demonstrate the breath of palliative care needs in the community and the various clinical approaches as well as challenges to providing palliative care in this setting.
2C: This session will explore, from both historical and research perspectives, the role of religion/spirituality in advanced illness. This will include a review of qualitative and quantitative data regarding the role of religion/spirituality in quality of life, coping, and end-of-life decision making. The session will then review core principles of spiritual care provision, including spiritual care guidelines, spiritual assessment, and the role of the multidisciplinary spiritual care team.
2B: This session will help participants understand the various kinds of pain and the classes of medications that are utilized for pain treatment. We will discuss pain syndromes and targeted treatment with co-analgesic and adjuvant pain medications. We will also discuss opioid use and management.
2A: This session will discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
1H: This session will be a case-based discussion using challenging cases supplied by audience members. For each case, we will discuss the elements that make the case challenging, the heuristic(s) that would be useful, the pathophysiology if relevant, the aspects of suffering manifested by the case, the team approach to understanding that suffering, and to resolving it when possible and appropriate. Audience members will be invited to participate in the discussion of others' cases as well as their own.
1G: A hallmark of palliative care is the interdisciplinary team process. Given the challenges of developing a plan of care for patients with serious illness, there are times when conflict may arise within the palliative care team or across teams providing care to the patient. A model of conflict resolution based on shared values and ethics across disciplines can help to constructively resolve such conflicts. Understanding the various styles of conflict resolution can aid interdisciplinary team members in navigating these challenging conversations with colleagues.
1F: This session will focus on the assessment, differential diagnosis, and management recommendations of depression and anxiety in the palliative care setting. Special attention will be paid to the unique clinical scenarios and specialized pharmacology of the palliative care patient. Less focus will be given to a detailed exploration of the various modes of psychotherapy applicable to this patient population.
1E: In this interactive session we will critically assess current practices related to code status discussions including identification of appropriate patients, timing of discussions and common challenges encountered. We will review the likely outcomes of in-hospital CPR and discuss strategies and communication pointers for effective code status discussions.
1D: This session will provide a general overview of the different organizational and staffing models for home-based palliative care including frequently encountered administrative and operational challenges posed by each model and; use patient vignettes from our own program to demonstrate the breath of palliative care needs in the community and the various clinical approaches as well as challenges to providing palliative care in this setting.
1C: This session will explore, from both historical and research perspectives, the role of religion/spirituality in advanced illness. This will include a review of qualitative and quantitative data regarding the role of religion/spirituality in quality of life, coping, and end-of-life decision making. The session will then review core principles of spiritual care provision, including spiritual care guidelines, spiritual assessment, and the role of the multidisciplinary spiritual care team.
1B: This session will help participants understand the various kinds of pain and the classes of medications that are utilized for pain treatment. We will discuss pain syndromes and targeted treatment with co-analgesic and adjuvant pain medications. We will also discuss opioid use and management.
1A: This session will discuss the Serious Illness Care Program, which is a population management tool to improve the care of patients with serious and life-threatening illnesses by creating a system in which patients and families are engaged in appropriate discussions with their clinicians about end-of-life care preferences that can then be documented and honored across the care network.
PL1: Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to: Describe the tools, training approach, and systems change elements that improve serious illness conversations; Describe the impact of the Serious Illness Care Program on patient outcomes; frequency, timing, and quality of serious illness conversations; and resource use; Identify the 8 elements of an effective serious illness conversation.