Program in Immunology Courses


 

For complete course listings, including syllabi, click here.

 

Immunology Courses Offered

 

Immunology 201. Principles of Immunology

Uli von Andrian and Shannon Turley, and faculty
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 1:30-3, with section Tu., Th., 3-4.

 

As a comprehensive core course in immunology, the topics include a broad but intensive examination of the cells and molecules on the immune system. Special attention is given to the experimental approaches that led to the general principles of immunology.

 

Note: Background in genetics and biochemistry is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: this course is intended for students who have had prior exposure to immunology at the undergraduate level. In the absence of such exposure, students MUST obtain the permission of the Course Director.

 

Immunology 202. Advanced Principles of Immunology

D. Branch Moody and Martin Hemler

Half course (spring semester). Tu., Th., 1:30-4:00pm

 

Continuation of Immunology 201 as an intensive core course in fundamentals of the immune system. Emphasis on systems of immunity. Critical reading of primary literature.

 

Note: Background in genetics and biochemistry is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: this course is intended for students who have had prior exposure to immunology at the undergraduate level. In the absence of such exposure, students MUST obtain the permission of the Course Director.

 

Immunology 204. Critical Reading for Immunology

Florian Winau

Half course (spring semester). Th., 10am-1pm

 

Original research articles from fields including immunology, biochemistry, genetics, and cell and developmental biology will be critically analyzed in an intensive small group format. Grading will be based on class participation and oral presentations.

 

Required for first-year immunology students; open to second-year students. No auditors allowed.

 

Immunology 219. The Primary Immunodeficiencies

Cox P. Terhorst

Half Course, Spring Semester. M., 4-6

 

This course discusses the mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of genetically determined primary human immunodeficiencies and selected human autoimmune diseases. Evaluates the use of animal models for study and therapy of human disease states.

 

Note: Given in alternate years.
Prerequisite: Course in basic immunology.

 

Immunology 302qc. Clinical Sessions in Immunology

Rachael Clark

Quarter Course (spring semester)

 

I. Course Objectives:

a. to give graduate students exposure to clinical medicine in an understandable and real way

b. to provide a setting for students to understand how animal models fit into the human disease experience

c. to give an overview of the clinical disease in humans vs. the immunological disease in animals (experimental interventions can be done with animals)

 

 

Immunology 301. Immunology Seminar Discussion Course

Michael Carroll and Nicholas Haining

Half course (fall and spring semesters). Wed., 3:30-5pm

 

The course is designed to give students exposure to the most current research topics in immunology. Students prepare for the weekly seminar through readings and discussion with the invited Seminar Speakers. These discussions are facilitated by members of the Committee on Immunology.

 

Note: Required for first-year Immunology graduate students.

 

Immunology 328r. Introduction to Research

Michael Carroll and faculty members

 

Three required laboratory rotations in immunology each lasting 10-12 weeks per laboratory. To be arranged by students with investigators affiliated with the immunology program.