BBS Faculty Member - Yi Zhang

Yi Zhang

Department of Genetics

Boston Children's Hospital
Warren Alpert Building, Room 149G
200 Longwood Ave.
Boston, MA 02115
Tel: 617-713-8666
Fax: 617-713-8665
Email: yzhang@genetics.med.harvard.edu
Visit my lab page here.



The Zhang lab is interested in how epigenetic modification-mediated dynamic changes in chromatin structure affects gene expression, stem cell reprogramming, germ cell development, beta-cell generation, and drug addiction. In the past decade, the lab has worked on a number of projects that span many aspects of epigenetic modifications that include: 1) ATP-dependent nucleosome-remodeling and deacetylase complex NuRD; 2) various histone methyltransferases, such as PRC2 (EZH2) and DOT1L; 3) various histone demethylases (JmjC family demethylases); 4) histone H2A ubiquitin E3 ligase PRC1; and 5) the Tet family of 5-methylsytosine dioxygenases. Build on the past 13 years of success at UNC-Chapel Hill, the lab has just relocate to HMS/CHB to embrace new opportunities and to meet the new challenges.

The lab is using cutting-edge technologies to understand the role of dynamic changes in DNA methylation and histone methylation in regulating gene expression during early embryogenesis, germ cell development, stem cell reprogramming, beta-cell regeneration and neurogenesis. The available rotation projects include:

1) Role of asymmetric DNA and histone modifications in preimplantation development;
2) Role of Tet associated proteins in regulating Tet enzymatic activity;
3) Role of epigenetic factors in iPS generation;
4) Role of Tet and 5mC oxidation products in differentiation and brain function.



Last Update: 8/22/2013



Publications

Wu, H., D’Alessioi, A.C., Ito, S., Xia, K., Wang, Z., Cui, K., Zhao, K., Sun, Y., and Zhang, Y. (2011). Dual functions of Tet1 in transcriptional regulation in mouse embryonic stem cells. Nature 473, 389-93.

Ito, S., Shen, L., Dai, Q., Wu, S.C., Collins, L.B., Swenberg, J.A., He, C., and
Zhang, Y. (2011). Tet proteins can convert 5-methylcytosine to 5-formalcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine. Science 333, 1300-03.

Inoue, A., and
Zhang, Y. (2011). Replication-dependent loss of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in mouse preimplantation embryos. Science 334, 194.

Liang, G., He, J., and
Zhang, Y. (2012). Kdm2b promotes induced pluripotent stem cell generation by facilitating gene activation early in reprogramming. Nature Cell Biol. 14, 457-466.



© 2013 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College