BBS Faculty Member - Brian Seed

Brian Seed

Department of Genetics

Massachusetts General Hospital
Simches Research Center, CPZN-7106
185 Cambridge Street
Boston, MA 02114
Tel: 617-726-5975
Fax: 617-643-3328
Email: bseed@ccib.mgh.harvard.edu
Lab Members: 13 postdoctoral fellows



Work in our lab is centered on approaches to identify interesting genes and pathway connections using automated methods for analysis of function. We have amassed a collection of high efficiency expression plasmids that encompass a large fraction of the human genome, which allows us to comprehensively explore the contributions of each gene product individually. We have also created simple systems for the rapid generation of homozygous mutant embryonic stem cells, and, by extension, convenient methods for the creation of homozygous mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Together these approaches provide a powerful and relatively simple system for rigorously evaluating the proposed roles of individual gene products for signaling in vivo.

A fraction of the lab is also engaged in the development of new therapeutic entities to treat human diseases. This effort is multidisciplinary and includes the development of technologies to address and correct acquired disorders as well as the creation of new biologicals and chemically modified hybrid biologicals. The majority of this effort is aimed at new approaches to treat tumors and metabolic conditions.



Last Update: 8/22/2013



Publications

For a complete listing of publications click here.

 


 

Ketteler R, Sun Z, Kovacs KF, He WW, Seed B. A pathway sensor for genome-wide screens of intracellular proteolytic cleavage. Genome Biol. 2008 Apr 3;9(4):R64.

Ting A, Lichtenthaler S, Xavier R, Na SY, Rabizadeh S, Holmes T, Seed B. Large-scale screens for cDNAs with in vivo activity. Novartis Found Symp. 2005;267:219-29.

Xavier R, Rabizadeh S, Ishiguro K, Andre N, Ortiz JB, Wachtel H, Morris DG, Lopez-Ilasaca M, Shaw AC, Swat W, Seed B. Discs large (Dlg1) complexes in lymphocyte activation. J Cell Biol. 2004 Jul 19;166(2):173-8.



© 2014 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College