Faculty & Staff

David Sinclair, Ph.D.

David Sinclair, Ph.D.

David Sinclair, Ph.D. is Co-Director of the Paul F. Glenn Laboratories for the Molecular Biology of Aging, a Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, Associate Member of the Broad Institute for Systems Biology, and co-founder of Sirtris Pharmaceuticals, Waltham, MA. Dr. Sinclair’s research aims to identify conserved longevity control pathways and devise small molecules that activate them, with a view to preventing and treating diseases caused by aging. His lab was the first to identify small molecules called STACs that can activate the SIRT pathway and extend lifespan of a diverse species. They also discovered key components of the aging regulatory pathway in yeast and is now focused on finding genes and STACs that extend the healthy lifespan of mice. More information →

Bruce A. Yankner, M.D., Ph.D.

Bruce A. Yankner, M.D., Ph.D.

Bruce A. Yankner, M.D., Ph.D. is Professor of Genetics and Neurology at Harvard Medical School, Director of the Harvard Neurodegeneration Training Program, and Co-Director of the Paul F. Glenn Laboratories for Biological Mechanisms of Aging. Dr. Yankner graduated from Princeton University, received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Stanford University, and did a residency at Massachusetts General Hospital. His work has contributed to understanding pathogenic mechanisms in Alzheimer’s disease, Down’s syndrome and Parkinson’s disease, beginning with the initial observation that amyloid beta protein is a toxic molecule, and later with investigations into the roles of presenilin proteins, notch and wnt in neuronal signaling and pathology. More information →

Marcia Haigis, Ph.D.

Marcia Haigis, Ph.D.

Marcia C. Haigis, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School and a member of the Paul F. Glenn Laboratories for Medical Research. Dr. Haigis received her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin in 2002 studying protein chemistry. She performed postdoctoral research at MIT in 2006 where she made fundamental discoveries connecting sirtuin function to mitochondrial metabolism. Dr. Haigis joined the Harvard faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2006. More information →

Amy J. Wagers, Ph.D.

Amy J. Wagers, Ph.D.

Amy Wagers is the Forst Family Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology at Harvard University, Senior Investigator in the Section on Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology at the Joslin Diabetes Center, an HHMI Early Career Scientist, and a member of the Paul F. Glenn Laboratories for the Biological Mechanisms of Aging at Harvard Medical School.  Dr. Wagers received her Ph.D. in Immunology and Microbial Pathogenesis from Northwestern University, and completed postdoctoral training in stem cell biology at Stanford University. More information →